Nevada Stations
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Pony Express Stations in Nevada Friday's Station Van Sickles' Station Carson City Dayton Miller's Station Fort Churchill Hooten Wells Carson Sink Sand Springs Middlegate Cold Springs Smith Creek Dry Wells Reese River Simpson Park Dry Creek Grubb's Well Robert's Creek Sulphur Springs Diamond Springs Jacob's Wells Ruby Valley Mountain Spring Butte Station Egan Station Schell Creek Spring Valley Antelope Springs Genoa Buckland's Station

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The Bureau of Land Management has marked the Pony Express route across Nevada. About 80 per cent of the route is on national resource lands and, therefore, is accessible to the public. Maps and detailed descriptions of each site and route have been preserved.

The Nevada desert is broken by almost a hundred separate mountain chains, all running north and south. The arid stretches between the mountain chains are dotted with sagebrush and greasewood. The few rivers have no outlets to the sea, but spread into great marshes before being swallowed by the thirsty soil. Nearly 500 miles of the Pony Express route lay through this desolate and uninhabited wilderness.

Sir Richard Burton, English adventurer-writer provided wouldbe travelers to the West with a comprehensive report of his Western tour in 1860. The starting point of Burton's tour was the railhead of St. Joseph, Missouri. His stagecoach followed the overland route through Salt Lake City to San Francisco. Burton's travels were reported in The City of the Saints and Across the Rocky Mountains to California orginally published in 1861, and provided detailed accounts of the Nevada Pony Express stations that he visited in October 1860.

Jaromy Jessop's Great American Desert web site has extensive information concerning the Pony Express Trail in Utah and Eastern Nevada.

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List of Stations

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Simpson Park

The site of the Simpson Park Pony Express Station is located on private land approximately fifteen miles north east of Austin. This was one of the original Pony Express stations having been built in the spring of 1860.

Problems arose early at this station. On June 2, 1860, Road Agent William Finney received a dispatch from Carson City advising him that the station at Simpson Park had been attack and razed on May 20. The body of the station keeper, James Alcott, had been found horribly mutalated and all of the animals missing.

Sir Richard Burton described the station on October 13, 1860:

"The station house in Simpson Park was being rebuilt. As we issued from Marmandom into Christendora,the civility of our hosts perceptibly diminished; the Judge, like the generality of Anglo Americans, did unnecessarily kow-two to those whom republicanism made his equals, and the 'gentlemen' when asked to do anything, became exceedlingly surly.

"The station was well provided with good minnie's, and the men apparently expected to use them; it was however, commanded by the neighboring heights, and the haystacks were exposed to fire at a time of the year when no more forage could be collected. The Venetian made for us some good light bread of wheaten flour, started or leavened with hop-water, and corn bread 'shortened' with butter, and enriched with two or three eggs.

"A hideaous Pa-Yuta and surly Shoshone, which I sketched, loitered about the station. They were dressed in the usual rabbit-skin cape, and carried little horn bows, with which they missed small marks at fifteen paces. The boys, who were now a-weary of watching, hired one of these men for a shirt -- tobacco was not to be had and a blanket was too high pay -- to mount guard through the night. Like the Paggi or Ramoose of W. India, one thief is paid to keep off many; the Indian is the best of warden, it being with him a priniciple not to attack what the presence of a fellow tribesman defends."

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Dry Creek

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Roberts Creek

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Diamond Springs

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Ruby Valley Station

Billy Fisher rode the Pony Express in eastern Nevada and later in the Utah Territory. In July 1860 Indians went on the warpath and destroyed the stations between Ruby Valley and Salt Lake City. Since there were no riders waiting to accept the mochila, Fisher rode the entire 300 miles, covering the distance in 30 hours using 8 horses and mules.

The Ruby Valley Pony Express Station was relocated to the grounds of the Northeastern Nevada Museum in Elko in 1960.

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Egan Canyon

Egan Canyon Station is located 30 miles north of Ely on US 93, just north of County Road 2 intersection. Some stone foundations still exist. The canyon was named for Howard Egan who had been in the area since the 1850s. He later became a Pony Express agent.

Egan Canyon was the site of many Indian ambushes. In July 1860, U.S. troops traveling from Fort Ruby to Schell Creek came upon an Indian attack at the Egan Canyon Pony Express Station barely saving the lives of the two stationmasters. Indian survivors of that skirmish took revenge on the next Pony Express stop, Schell Creek Station, killing the stationmaster and two assistance and running off all of the livestock.

Billy Fisher provides a very good description of Egan Canyon Station. The original Pony Express Trail through Egan Canyon is suitable for motor vehicle travel, hiking, and horseback riding. When you travel through the canyon you can easily see why it was an ideal ambush place. Go 1/2 mile south from junction and turn west on the County Road to Egan Canyon. Travel time by vehicle through the canyon and back is about one hour.

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